Organic Gardening Compost Saves You Money and Helps Save the Earth

Synthetic fertilizers are out and organic gardening compost is the in thing with farmers who are trying the holistic way in planting.

With organic gardening, farmers are returning to the most basic way of growing plants and trees by being one with nature. That is, they no longer use artificial fertilizers and commercially available pesticides, but instead rely on the natural environment to be able to grow produce.

Organic Gardening Compost is a mixture of decaying plants, animal manure or other organic materials used as fertilizer.

Hot Compost - Fallen leaves is like wealth for gardeners as this is the start of their composting process. The first thing to do is bag those leaves. Clipped grass from mowed surfaces can also be put in the bag.

To bring in oxygen and a quantity of water enough to dampen the leaves systematically, put several holes near the bag's top and at its bottom. The holes will also let the carbon dioxide out and excess water as well. Pour in about two shovelful of garden soil into the bag where the leaves are, then shake it to mix the contents. Or if not possible, just roll the bag thoroughly.

Mixing should be done on a schedule every other week. Check on the leaves and pour water to moisten those if they've dried out. In about two to three months, the compost is ready. The contents of the bag that look like dark and flaky stuff are your compost.

To use it as a fertilizer for your plants, put an inch thick layer on the soil's top layer. That will then be absorbed by the plants. It acts as fertilizer and at the same time pesticide and can even prevent weeds from growing. It also contributes in conserving water as your plants won't need as much.

To be able to come up with the same output at lesser time, try shredding the leaves first before sacking it all up.

Cold Compost - The difference between cold and hot compost is that the first is easier to do than the latter which takes more effort.

Cold compost can be done by simply gathering wastes from your own backyard, like leaves, grass clippings and weeds, then piling them up. Allow a period of six to twenty-four months for earthworms and other microorganisms break the stuff down. While waiting, you can add materials to your pile. In this process, the stuff at the bottom decomposes first.

But aside from the long wait, this type of compost is not as effective as the hot compost. It cannot kill weeds and pathogens. Also, before using it, you should screen un-decomposed materials from the pile.

Whichever you choose between the two, you're still on the winning side by using organic gardening compost because not only you are saving money but more so, you are helping to conserve and clean the environment.