If someone says Oregano, it's likely that you will think in terms of cuisine.

You would be right - most people do think of Oregano in sauces and so forth. However, there are actual medicinal properties to Oregano as well.

Oregano makes a luscious cup of savory tea that works well for gas, indigestion, bloating, coughs, urinary problems, bronchial problems, headaches, swollen glands and to induce and regulate a woman's menstrual cycle.

Others swear that it can cure fevers, diarrhea, vomiting, and jaundice.

In the capsule form, the leaves are dried and then crushed and placed into the empty capsule shell. Further, some people use the dried leaves by crushing them and adding just enough water to create a paste like substance and use it as a cream to apply for arthritis, itchy skin, sore muscles, and swelling.

For a relaxing and soothing bath, use Oregano leaves in the bath water. Finally, some people make Oregano oil and claim it helps rid toothaches.

In Jamaica, people burn Oregano scented incense to ward off coughs and other respiratory distresses.

Oregano has been used in ancient Greece and many other places across the globe where people have found a different use for Oregano besides cooking.

Oregano is a perennial herb that is a relative to the mint family. It is a very important culinary herb used in a lot of Greek and Italian cuisines. For cooking purposes, it is the leaves that are used and while some like nothing but a fresh Oregano sprig, most will agree that the dried Oregano is much more flavorful.

Especially in Italian cooking, you will notice a distinct relationship between the uses of Oregano in combination with Basil. The two always seem to create the perfect marriage especially in a tomato sauce. Oregano is also used on many vegetable dishes as well as a seasoning on various meats. The Greeks would never consider cooking without Oregano in their pantry. The famous Greek salad boasts its flavor of Oregano. No one could imagine eating a piece of pizza without a taste of Oregano added to it.

Oregano is commonly mistaken for Marjoram as the plants look very similar. Outside of the kitchen Marjoram and Oregano are best friends and do a lot together. The pair has quite plentiful properties in the areas of antioxidants and antibacterial.

Together they are not only a great combination for flavoring food but also for preserving it too.

Because both of their oils are perfumery they are placed in many different soaps and lotions. They are also used in combination for many potpourris and home décor.

Oregano has been around since ancient times both in and out of the kitchen. It had many medicinal properties then and it still does now. It was used in the kitchen and it is still used there now so those from ancient times started a tradition that is still followed to this day. Oregano's uniqueness is fully utilized in many different ways and will be for years to come.


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