Marjoram



Marjoram is the dried leaves from an herbal plant called the Origanium hortensis. The name Marjoram is a Greek word that means "Joy of the Mountain." Ancient Greeks believed that if Marjoram grew on a grave that person would enjoy eternal happiness. The taste of Marjoram is a bit sweeter than that of Oregano. Many people believe that Marjoram is, in part, a species of Oregano. Marjoram is a pretty user friendly herb that is used quite traditionally in Italian, French, North African, Middle Eastern, and American cuisine. Marjoram compliments quite nicely sausages, various meats, fish, tomato sauces, salad dressings, breads, stuffing's, and salads.

Marjoram is a relative to the mint family. You get the most flavors from Marjoram if you use the fresh leaves rather than fried marjoram. One big difference between Oregano and Marjoram is while Oregano tends to prosper in taste the longer it simmers in a sauce or stew, marjoram is the opposite and should be added into the dish as late as possible. Although Marjoram is sweet and mild, it is also at the same time minty and has a hint of citrus. The biggest Marjoram exported in Egypt. Marjoram blends very well with Bay Leaves, pepper, and Juniper. While all vegetables can benefit from a hint of Marjoram, it seems to work best on adding and enhancing the flavor of cabbage and legumes.

Many people find a great benefit from Marjoram in aromatherapy oils. Marjoram is said to have a soothing and warming effect with a spicy and warm scent. This explains why it is so popular with those who enjoy the many benefits of aromatherapy. Many times for aromatherapy oils it will be mixed with lavender, bergamot, and cedar wood. Beyond the great world of aromatherapy Marjoram has many other beneficial uses too as it is used as an analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, and as a diuretic. The many uses of Marjoram include treatment for anxiety, arthritis, bronchitis, bruises, colic, constipation, digestive problems, gas, insomnia, muscle aches and pain, PMS, Rheumatism, sinusitis, and sprains.

Quite often people use Marjoram on a daily basis in various forms. Some prefer it as a tea which has been used throughout history for easing such ailments as hay fever, indigestion, sinus congestion, asthma, stomach upset, headache, dizziness, coughs, colds, and disorders associated with the nervous system. Some even use the tea as a mouthwash. One or two cups of marjoram tea per day have proven to be extremely therapeutic. Marjoram can be made into an ointment or salve by crushing the dried herbs into a paste, adding just a tiny bit of water. This is a common way to treat sprains and Rheumatism. Even still, some will mix the Marjoram into a paste and then into an oil to use for tooth pain or gum issues.

Marjoram should not be ingested internally in a medicinal or herbal form during pregnancy but can be eaten as an herb that is added to food. As you can see, Marjoram is a very essential and beneficial herb that was used in ancient times and is commonly still used today.





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Common Herbs

Ginseng
Eucalyptus
Oregano
Basil
Dandelion
Tarragon
Belladonna
Marjoram
Golden Seal
Catnip
Balsam Of Tolu
Gypsywort
Rosemary
Sage
Cilantro
Cloves
Asafoetida
Thyme
Parsley
Echinacea
Burdock
Frankincense
Chamomile
Ginkgo Biloba






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